How can you make value visible?

Posted by Integratis on Wednesday, October 22, 2014

Read any book, article or blog about sales and you’ll probably come across some reference to the need for the sales person to provide value to the customer. But the real question should be “how can a sales person make their value more visible to the customer?”

Sales people who differentiate their value succeed

Sales people must make value visible to the customerMost sales people work for a company where they have developed solutions which can add value to the customer’s business. The challenge is to persuade the customer that the value that one company (or sales person) provides is greater than the value presented by their competition. In many cases it is not the ‘best company’ or ‘best solution’ that wins the sale but rather the sales person who was able to make their value more visible to the customer. You’ll often hear people say that company 'A' was simply “out-sold” by company 'B'. What they really mean is that the sales person in company 'B' did a better job of making their differentiated value more visible to the customer.

How sales people make value visible

It’s no use having the best solution for the customer if you can’t make that value visible. So how can sales people make value visible? The starting point has to be to focus on the customer first, not on your product or service. This may appear counter-intuitive but the problem is that most sales people think that the value proposition is all about themselves and their product. It’s not; the value proposition
should be all about the customer and what your product or solution can do for the customer. Therefore, the sales person who can articulate the value that their solution can provide to the customer is more likely to win the deal.

Understand the value the customer is looking for

In complex sales scenarios (where there is more than one person involved in making the buying decision) this is even more important. This is because the sales person has to determine what type of value each individual member of the customer’s buying team is looking for, and then make that value visible to them personally. If they succeed in doing this they are more likely to win the support of all involved.

understand what value all members of the customer team are looking forFor example, let’s say that one sales person believes that part of their value proposition is that they are the market leader in their space. What does that mean to the customer? What is the value to the customer of this vendor being the market leader? The answer depends on who the sales person is addressing in the customer: for the CFO, or financial buyer, it might mean financial stability, the fact that the company is likely to be here for the long-term. For someone in marketing perhaps it has to do with brand and market perception. They want to be seen to business with a successful company. For someone in the implementation team perhaps it has more to do with experience and having a trusted, tried and tested solution. For others it might represent the potential economic value of being able to buy a solution at a fair price because the vendor has better economies of scale.

Sales people tell customers engaging stories to articulate their value sales people understand their value and can articulate it

The key task for any sales person is to determine what their differentiating value is, and to find a way to make it more visible to the customer. One of the most effective ways of doing that is for the sales person to have a story to back-up any claim or value proposition. People remember stories. They re-tell stories. Customers are far more likely to remember a story which provides a good example of the value that the vendor provides. Good stories, customer success stories, references and market innovations help the customer to see and appreciate the real value that the vendor can bring to them. People will buy from sales people they trust – and sales people who are able to bring their value to life, to make their value visible by telling meaningful success stories.


What does Consultative Selling actually mean?

Posted by Integratis on Monday, October 06, 2014

When we teach people about consultative selling, adopting a consultative sales approach, what exactly do they need to do? We believe that becoming a consultative sales person requires becoming more proactive and developing a new mindset. A mindset which is different from the traditional transactional focus.Consultative selling reqiures being more proactive & adopting a more long term focus

Transactional selling

Transactional salespeople focus on the transaction, on making the sale. They focus on what they have to sell, their products and services and how these might be able to benefit the customer. The focus is on closing the deal; and therefore it tends to be short term.

Consultative Selling

Truly consultative selling requires a new mindset, a different approach, a change in the way we are seen by the customer. A consultative sales person wants to be viewed by the customer as being an expert, as someone who is focusing on them, and on their clients too i.e. the customer's customer. Consultative sales people focus not simply on winning the deal but on helping the customer to win. This requires developing a more long-term focus. Clearly the objective is to still win the business, but at the same time a consultative sales person wants their customer to win too – so more business can be developed with their customer in the future.

Consultative selling is  about focusing on the customer & their customers, not on what you have to sell Developing a new mind set

This new mindset is fundamentally about being more proactive and less reactive in the sales approach. Reactive, transactional sales people respond to customer needs and react to customer demand. Proactive sales consultants look for ideas and opportunities to help the customer to win in their market.

Consultative sales people understand that customers value insight

Research conducted by Huthwaite research reinforced this point; thousands of senior executives said Huthwaite research showed sales people who have insight & can offer solutions & identify new business opportunities will get appointments with senior executivesthey would be willing to meet with a sales person who was proactive and could deliver real value and insight. These executives said they would be happy to meet with a sales person who could do the following:

1. Identify unrecognized opportunities

By this they meant they wanted ideas, proactive ideas about new opportunities, opportunities ‘that they had not recognized themselves’. In other words, the value to the senior executive wasn't from the sales person’s products or services but from their potential insight, being able to suggest and discuss new ideas and opportunities which the senior executive had not yet considered and 
helping to identify a new business opportunity.

2. Find solutions to problems

Senior executives also said they would talk to sales people who could help them to find a new solution to an existing business problem, which they were struggling to resolve. They thought that the sales person might be aware of a solution from talking to other customers. Again  the belief was that the sales person could bring insight from outside the company.

3. Highlight future business problemsConsultative selling is about having insight, finding solutions to customer's problems & identifying new opportunities

The third area was perhaps the more challenging for sales people. Senior executives said they would meet with sales people who could highlight a future business problem which they might not have realized was coming. Again, the sales person's value is in their insight and expertise, because they are out in the market, they are aware of what’s happening; observing trends, being proactive.

The insight and value of a consultative sales person

The value a consultative sales person provides comes from their expertise and insight, not just from their products and services. It comes from their ability to identify new opportunities, to find new solutions and to identify future business problems. A consultative sales person's value is in their proactivity and in being able to articulate these to the customer - this is the approach and mindset we advocate for consultative selling.


What are the right questions to ask in selling?

Posted by Integratis on Tuesday, August 05, 2014

Importance of asking good questions in consultative sellingIf listening is important to developing a consultative selling style, the ability to ask good questions is just as critical. Asking the right sales questions will help to build the customer relationship and advance the sales process. This involves trying to understand what the customer is thinking so that we know how to respond to them and offer them the best solutions to address their concerns. We do this by asking them the right consultative questions to determine:

  • an understanding of each other

  • their personal perception

  • Whether they have a different view

  • What they think is the most important issue

  • What their underlying concerns are

The answers to these fairly simple questions helps the sales person to focus their value proposition on things that are important to the customer. The type of insightful questions that the sales person asks conveys a great deal to the customer about the value they can provide, but how?  

How to ask the right sales questions

If you think about the news for example, a news reporter demonstrates their experience, their knowledge and their understanding of a situation by asking the right sort of questions to a politician. Similarly, a sales manager can show how much they know about the business by asking insightful questions of a salesperson about where they are in the sales cycle, or the buying cycle.  You might have experienced this yourself, where the sales manager can convey a lot about their knowledge, not by telling you, but by asking pertinent questions - and it's the same for the customer - when they see a salesperson who asks insightful questions it shows more than anything else that they understand, and that they know what's happening.

Different types of consultative questionsSales call planning, asking insightful questions

These are the five consultative questioning types all of which can provide you a great deal of information:

  1. Perception questions

  2. Implication questions

  3. Business value questions

  4. Validating questions

  5. Leading questions

The ONLY way to have a valuable sales conversation – for both you and your prospect – is to plan your questions ahead of time. Think about what you can ask that gets your prospect talking about their situation, their issues and yes, their challenges. Think about questions that might actually provoke your customer – making them think about things they haven’t thought of before. Figure out what you need to ask to determine if making a change makes good sense for your prospect. Write everything down. Then, when you actually do meet, you can say, 'In preparation for today’s meeting, I wrote down a few questions.' Now, you can relax and really listen. What have you found works best for you?


The Trusted Advisor| attributes to develop the partnership

Posted by Integratis on Wednesday, April 02, 2014

Trusted advisor

The previous posts about how to become a trusted advisor 'The Trusted Advisor' by David H. Maister, Charles H. Green & Robert M. Galford,' discussed how to earn trust, give advice and build relationships. Along side developing these skills, it is important to know how to focus on the other person, to be self-confident, to put your own ego aside, to be curious, to maintain a high degree of inclusive professionalism and always be sincere.

Focus on the other person

“The only way to influence someone is to find out what they want and show them how to get it” Dale Carnegie. To achieve this degree of influence it is essential to be able to focus on the other person giving them what they need and want. It is not about providing them with your knowledge or expertise but more about giving reassurance, helping the client see new approaches and make decisions. The ability to become an empathetic listening is key to this. How well we succeed in this depends on how able we are to truly feel what the other person feels, focusing on them not our own self-promotion. This is a skill that takes years of learning to master but it reaps great rewards.

Self confidence

What is being referred to in the context of being a trusted advisor is the ability to have the self confidence to listen and understand and brainstorm before offering solutions. To put aside the fear that we are squandering critical influencing time by not immediately providing solutions.

Ego

This is the ability to focus on the consultative relationship process, the issues at hand and not on any blame or credit attached to it.

Curiosity

To solve other’s problems we need to ask questions, and to listen, in other words to be curious focusing not on what we know but what we don't know. It is our curiosity which creates the situations which allow us to contribute.

Inclusive Professionalism

becoming a trusted advisor

By this we mean being able to align with our clients to work collaboratively by acknowledging and engaging them to find solutions rather than just providing them ourselves.

Sincerity

We demonstrate our sincerity to others by caring behavior, by our attention and interest, by our research and by how we listen. When we then respond enthusiastically we invite the other person to explore with us the possibilities and solutions. Being sincere is a critical element of any relationship and of trust. Sometimes we might find ourselves in a situation where it is impossible to relate or be sincere. As long are really sure that you have tried everything you can there are times when you have to accept the situation for what it is and walk away. In relationships there really are only win-win and loose-loose combinations.

Being sincere and building a strong client relationship doesn’t mean you have to become your client’s friend. To be a trusted advisor you have to care and show you care. Being sociable with your client will definitely deepen your understanding of your client’s needs and fears but that doesn’t imply that you have to become their good friend. If you are attentive to your clients needs the effectiveness of the sales process will be enhanced. To earn trust you will need to do this and to be vested in the long-term benefit of the relationship. 

Ultimately you are not trying to build a relationship that is simply a means to an end but you are trying to create a partnership that will mean you go on a journey together to resolve your clients needs. What do you think, do you have any other suggestions, we would love to hear from you?!