How well do you value your team members?

Posted by Integratis on Tuesday, July 22, 2014

Inspiring your team to adopt a new culture

Valuing people and ethics helps them to understand vision &embrace changeHow do you get your team to behave differently, to adopt the culture, the values and vision that you have? Regardless of how many programs you run, training you introduce or speeches you make, if the people within your organization don’t either understand or are not inspired enough to want to embrace change little will alter.

So what can a leader do about this? I would suggest one important step would be to look at the corporate culture of your company. How valued do your people feel? Do they really understand the vision and feel that they have a part to play? Do they believe that their efforts can and would make a difference or do they consider that all that anyone cares about is the bottom line, increased revenue numbers?  Corporations that are successful like Southwest Airlines, Zappos and Google all have value based cultures, they care about core values such as integrity, ethics and most importantly their people, does your company?

What is a value based culture?

 A corporation with a value based culture means that they, as an entity, give equal weight to ethics and business success in performance evaluations. They celebrate when members of the team show integrity and core values like honesty and trust. It doesn’t mean that sales success and increased revenue isn’t important, it means establishing a culture that cares. The corporate message to employees says we care about our people’s success, we will help with their development and equip them with the right skills to achieve the personal success they seek, we believe everyone matters and together we can achieve our goals.

How is a vale based culture created?

Changing a corporate culture so that all employees really understand and embrace it won’t happen over night and it must be led from the top.

Leaders who lead by example & ensure values are all pervading inspire their team

A value based culture needs to be:

  1. Part of the entire corporate strategy - It has to a carefully thought out strategy led from the top down, embraced at every level and  incorporated into all the processes of how business is achieved. It must run through every communication and corporate practice including performance appraisals, promotion and recruiting practices. It is not just a matter of introducing new compliance or ethics programs it has to be all encompassing evident in everything the company does.
  2. Demonstrated by example - The best way a leader can demonstrate a caring value based culture is in their behavior; they way they talk to people, how they treats others at every level, whether they are accessible, whether they are prepared to listen, are empathetic and understanding. Such leaders are humble and find meaningful and visible ways to show how living company values in day-to-day behavior can help deliver on the priorities.
  3.  All encompassing within the corporation - To succeed the culture cannot function in isolation, it has to touch the hearts and minds of everyone within the organization. Leaders can achieve this by developing deeper partnerships with all departments; human resources, corporate communications, and environmental and social responsibility departments. 

Recent research by the Catalyst Research Center for Advancing Leader Effectiveness, which collected 1,500 responses from workers around the world, as reported in the Harvard Business Review clearly showed that: 'Employees who perceived altruistic behavior from their managers also reported being more innovative, suggesting new product ideas and ways of doing work better…..Moreover, they were more likely to report engaging in team citizenship behavior, going beyond the call of duty, picking up the slack for an absent colleague--all indirect effects of feeling more included in their workgroups.'

A culture that emphasizes the promotion of core values, ethics and leadership produces happier workers, improved customer satisfaction and a sustained competitive advantage in the marketplace. Isn’t that a culture you would like to have?


Would you buy from someone you didn’t like or trust?

Posted by Integratis on Wednesday, July 09, 2014

Building trust is key to forming sales relationshipsWhen we talk about consultative selling we are constantly stressing the importance of developing trust to help build a successful business relationship. Think about it for a minute, who would you prefer to buy from, someone who puts your back up and makes you feel uncomfortable or someone you like and respect? Trusting people is the key to any successful relationship and it should be the consultative sales person’s continual focus throughout the entire sales cycle. ‘How to develop successful sales relationships’.  

The relationship test

There are three basic tests to a relationship with someone, which your customers almost certainly consider when they start to get to know you:

  1. Do you trust them? - Trust is the most important. If you can’t trust the other person, you have no relationship or partnership.

  2. Do you like them? – 'Can I get along with this person?' 'Do I want to work with them?'

  3. Can they do the job? - 'Can they provide the service?' Your customer often has many choices as to who can provide the service they are seeking. Have you ever wondered why a customer has bought an inferior product or service from another supplier? It’s because they trusted the person who sold it to them.

People buy from people

People buy from people the like and trust The reason that trust is so important is “people buy from people” and “they buy from people they trust and like it” - ‘people do business with people’. To illustrate this point let’s look at the example of Mark McCormack, founder of a company called IMG and well known from his book “What they don't teach you at Harvard Business School”. McCormack built the largest sports marketing company in the world - he developed sponsorships for golfers, tennis players, racing drivers and was once considered the most powerful man in sport. He was renowned for having built most of his successful relationships with the world’s greatest sports people, on the basis of a handshake!  McCormack said: “it's a basic fact that all things being equal, people prefer to buy from friends, it is also true that when all things are not equal people still prefer to buy from friends!”

How to build trust with the customer

So what can you do to develop trust with your customers and successfully build your relationship with them?

  1. Focus on the customer first. Think about the customer's customer and show that you really care about their success.

  2. Demonstrate your experience, your knowledge and your expertise all of which will add value. People will then start to trust the information that you give them.

  3. Deliver what you promise. It sounds simple but you would be surprised how few sales people simply follow the basics.

  4. Be reliable and trustworthy. Become known to the customer for being reliable and trustworthy. This means simple things, like returning calls on time; sending follow-up information if you promise to do that. It means maintaining confidences. More than anything else it simply means "if you say you're going to do something, do it"

So to summarize, developing trust throughout the sales cycle is absolutely critical. You can develop trust by focusing on the basics; by delivering what you promise. By doing what you say, you can differentiate yourself from your personal competition, that is, from those other salespeople who are trying to sell to your customer. By being more focused on trust, more likable, you will build and strengthen your relationship with the customer such that they will want to do business with you because they trust and like you.